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. capitalism is predicated on unlimited growth, but we live in a finite environment and we seem to have a dysfunctional democracy unable to resolve that contradiction. how do you see climate change and our diminishing natural resources such as fossil fuels and water impacting this crisis in capitalism? >> capitalism is a system geared up to doing three things on the part of business: get more profits, grow your company and get a larger market share. those are the driving bottom line issues. corporations are successful or not if they succeed in getting these objectives met. that's what their boards of directors are chosen to do, that's what their shareholders expect. that's the way the system works. if along the way they have to sacrifice either the well-being of their workers or the well-being of the planet or the environmental conditions, they may feel very bad about it, and i know plenty of them who do. but they have no choice. and they will explain if they're honest that that's the way this system works. so we have despoiled our environment in a classic way. that's why we have huge c
. it has changed, moved from a launch platform to a network/feedback environment. >> and i found that a lot of businesses were there to get attention which is great as we saw on the reel. a lot of people wearing funny t-shirts and costumes. for small business that is have a dream, south by southwest, 20,000 something people there, if you want attention, maybe it will help you find it there. >> the piece we did was about networking. these guys networked to meet each other at this founder speed dating, in essence. they had one there. when you go to a conference that is 20,000 people, how do you network effectively? >> you do work before you get there. hopefully you've already built part of your own community, so to speak, to follow you and you follow others and so you do a lot of the scheduling by the time you get down there. and you keep it tight and loose in the sense you're booking the never eat alone principle. in between that really concentrated environment to navigate and hopefully pick up some new relationships. >> the best thing to do, have cell phone numbers. two, confirm the night b
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." i'm larry kudlow. stocks may have dropped today but we've still got even more good news on the economy. now does that mean bern bernanke is going take his foot off the gas pedal sooner rather than later? that might be what's rather bothering stock investors. and where is the new jack kemp now that we need him? a republican who related to everyone with an optimistic but simple message of economic growth for all, we will ask lar larry sabateau in just a few minutes. >> a tax is a tax is a tax. if you tax something more, you get less of it. piling on new taxes is always bad for economic growth period. and yet out of washington comes yet another proposal for another tax. this one known as the marketplace fairness act but it is just a national internet sales tax. could even hit yo
been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>. >> greta: here a question for you. what do you think is more important to the american people keeping the white house open for tourists or elvis cruises? we know what the majority of the united states senate think and tom coburn. nice to see you senator. apparently, i have an amendment and it was voted down. tell me first what the amendment was. i'm going to ask you questions about it? >> what we did is eliminate a bunch of wasteful spending and transfer that money to the national park service so we can open up our major parks on time this spring and also give the park service money so that we can open up the white house. the excuse has been the white house can't be open up because secret service have been furloughed but if you look at the numbers they haven't been furloughed. so it has to do with
institutions and environment with access to care. we had conversation and a disruption and we also have to acknowledge treatment and trust. it also have access to the system. it is not just going to be about what the benefits look like. but whether we can educate americans that are impacted. we need to have access to these health care services that they need at the end of the day. we are talking about what we know. including age and race. people of color are less likely to experience that in health care system. there is a story behind that that we have not necessarily gone to the heart. but we are really going to address health care, we really need to take about this and there has to be a way to address these populations that continue to experience this. our health care is overwhelming impacted by this. we are going to start to appropriate this. >> i think that the fact it is said that, i wonder if that is a the question that we have an answer just yet. like what is the accountability in the system itself and how is a transforming. how do we tackle that. >> [inaudible] >> we have conver
will be a long-term problem. ashley: as long as this goes on, doug, we talk about the goldilocks environment but it is exactly what it is. it is not too hot to prompt the fed to pull back on its qe. but it is not too cold to push the economy into a recession. so kind of of in this same environment. how long do you think this could last? >> i don't buy the goldilocks analogy because we are in a low to zero growth. fourth quarter gdp in the u.s. is still zero. corporate profits in the third quarter were negative. we're slightly positive now. but first quarter consensus is negative again. where is goldilocks? only the fed stimulus, the fed is protecting a really tight monetary stance by u.s. congress, raising taxes, and, no, i don't see goldilocks at all. tracy: goldilocks is arguably uncle ben, right? he is not going anywhere anytime soon, right? i could make a argument, sell in may, do away thing doesn't count this year. >> i agree with that one, uncle ben. i hadn't heard that before. ultimately it i is pushing on a string. you need to have private economy, you need u.s. corporations, you nee
the cash method of accounting. what to make of, well the entire environment for growing a business in this country? ali wing, founder and ceo of giggle, the baby chain of stores and online sales. she joins us now. in terms of what you're seeing, just broadly, ali, the tax environment for you, it is getting worse, no? >> it is. i'm actually just in the middle of annual compensation reviews. i know every employee right now is feeling less in their take-home pay. that is a pressure of a different type for businesses. but it's the same old theme, whether it was not charging online only businesses sales tax or people off-line had to have it. just needing to even the playing field. not a disinincident tiff to big next generation of big businesses in america and right now it is still uneven. dagen: we talked about though the complications created by government, local government, state governments, the federal government in running a business today. we're celebrating the anniversary of the health care law and, what we've seen washington do in recent years. is it getting worse to grow a bus
on by the environment and health choices. revealing a lot of its secrets to us, is helping us to nail down what that heredity looks like and how we may learn enough about it to influence outcomes, so if you are born with a high risk of alzheimer's, maybe there is something you can do about it before you get the disease. >> what did he do in st. louis? >> he was examined by the cancer experts. they conducted dna analysis from his blood, and that could tell born with, he was and then they could look at the specific dna in the cancer cells. cancer comes about because of bornkes in the dna you are with, causing them to grow when they should not, and in his cancer genome, they found a dozen or some mistakes that were acquired during life that were driving those cells to grow, and at least one of those not previously described suggested the possibility of using a therapy you would not normally have contemplated for esophageal cancer, so there was a chance to try something that was rational, sort of evidence-based, a designer drug based upon the detail. this is where cancer is going. the idea that can
for a strong working environment for middle class. we have a different vision on how to get there. one is a government run or government -- where things are dictated from healthcare to regulations. those are the kinds of things i believe stifle growth. i'm part of our freshman group working on regulatory reform. we are going to talk about that. is not take away the ability for someone to take away the pea, -- epa, but it helps those affected by it. there are real business affected. regulations are cutting -- the best way to help this country is to get washington in that so that it is -- so our free-trade agreements can work, so that our products can be sold overseas. free-trade trade is what we need to be part of. follow up onter, your syrian comments, "so you are against sending troops to syria?" said. that's not what i we have to figure out what is the proper role for us to play in syria. again, a comment i heard this morning -- what do we have a un for if it is completely useless ? i agree that right now, the un is basically useless in this situation. here is one thing that is ,mazi
life could have, indeed, once existed there. >> for the first time we are seeing an ancient environment on mars which is habitable. it just looks different than the planet does today instead of red, it's gray. there was plenty of water. >> curiosity landed on mars back in august, you might recall. the mission last one martian year. that translates into 687 earth days, shepard. we're about halfway through. >> shepard: all right. casey stegall in dallas tonight. cabin owners are now looking for what's left after a huge fire ripped through a mountain side resort. and that tops our news across newark. america. tennessee, the fire broke out late sunday night at a cabin near the north carolina border. heavy winds quickly fanned the flames to dozens of other structures. black hawk helicopters help battled thing all day yesterday. officials say some rain fall last night finally helped contain the thing. it charred some 200 acres and destroyed more than 60 cabins. nobody hurt. maryland. a massive water main break beneath a busy intersection north of d.c. the pipe burst last night sending water 2
is not only the environment -- although he did use the word environment -- but it's also us. it's you and me, our brothers and sisters, it's moms and dads. that's part of our mission in life, to be of service to others. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> we tried to get out of the way of the music from time to time. it's mid 50's in rome this morning and pretty steady wind at 15 to 20 miles an hour. you can see making for a beautiful sight with the flags there. the music is not one choir but two. lauren green with some details on those. one of them sang at the pap al mass. >> this is the sistine chapel choir along with the sacred music choir. both of them are vatican choirs. interesting enough, the last time i heard the sistine chapel choir was in november when they premiered a work by monsignor raptsinger, the brother of pope benedict xvi. they are an incredible choir. you saw one of the members, sopranos singing earlier as part of the mass. they are an incredible choir. they have sung all over the world and they are known all over the world, and they sing in many sacred music festivals. they are mainstays of
that but certainly underlines the political nature of the administration's handling of the post-benghazi environment. and i can't wait to read these memos. i'm sure they will be a real treat. i think it will simply increase demands in congress for answers about the real facts of benghazi that after six months we still haven't gotten skbri mean, the thoughts on hacking, everybodies that -- everybody has their feeling how this should be handled the law doesn't crack down on people's ability to tap into private exchanges. one thing i think it truly highlights here, if there is a need in social media, even extending into the law breakers, to learn more about what happened, it does, does it not, say something about the energy in this country to produce some truth in this matter? >> yeah. i think there should be more protection for intellectual property on the internet, for people's own communications but i certainly have no faith in the privacy protections now. that is why my e-mails are pretty boring. this is a, dealing with sensitive matters of national security does raise a question, i think, whether
as we've really created institutions and our community and environment where everybody else wanted to achieve access to care. the party had conversation another these deceptions deceptions and health care services or deception in providers. we also have to knowledge the historical experiences of mistreatment and mistrust in communities of color as well as lgbt communities have experienced discrimination, but also discrimination trying to get access to the system. as a look at health care reform implementation, it's not just that the benefits for quite. it's about whether or not the lgbt americans were overwhelmingly and acted will have access to this health care services they need. at the end of 80s talking about the treatment cascade for the analysis by age and race is that a younger american people of color is less likely to experience depression and less likely to be engaged in the health care system. there's a story behind that we haven't necessarily cut to the heart of, but if are going to address health disparities, will have a chance that has to be seated in conversation or
create and raise in the best environment. >> oh, boy. >> i couldn't hear that. >> stephanie: she was talking about -- i'm sorry. play it one more time. >> put your headphones on. >> i'm sorry. >> stephanie: i hated to aren't you than beautiful hair too. >> the institution of marriage and marriage laws are designed to attach mothers and fathers to each other and to the children that they may create and raise in the best environment. >> straights are automatically great parents. >> stephanie: you can read a story a day of some horrific story about straight parents. >> two things to say about that, that somehow marriage is only about raising children and there's plenty of straight couples that have no intention of raising any children at all. and in fact, if they do raise children many of them aren't even married. but i can tell you i know many, many many, many same-sex couples, whether it's two lesbians together or two gay men, and they're making wonderful parents and their kids are wonderfully adjusted. it really -- their children may turn out gay but you know, their sexuality --
world leaders on the big spring, he having told them to respect the environment, think about the weak and the poor. once again this pope bringing his simple style to the most grand of ceremonies. catholics and the simply curious of every color and creed gathered for a ceremony stretching back thousands of years. 132 official delegations from around the world came, and leaders of every faith. few religious celebrations as grand, or steeped in ritual as the installation of a pope in the catholic church. from early in the day, hundreds of thousands poured into the square. the pope choosing to greet them in an open jeep instead of the well-protected pope mobile. at one point stepping down, reaching out to children, the sick. the cheers of the faithful here, an audible embrace. then the 266th pope praying at the tomb of peter, leaders alongside him healing the divide 1,000 years old. here to witness history, vice president biden and royalty, a humble priest from south america, his message, remember the poor. a communion shared by all, a day no one will forget. and in the last half hour, vi
strategic environment and about america's interest forward. finally i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of the most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. fors equally known brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his success in battles in the iraq war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain trus
should. that centers provide a safe and welcoming homelike environment for veterans receiving home care, counseling, and group settings. veterans often feel very comfortable in that non-root -- non-bureaucratic environment. the mental health services closer to their homes, in certain situations they use madison to link to clinicians in medical centers. the va has done an excellent job in terms of telehealth in general. it is critical that they provide these options for care, making sure they remain available and the veterans know about them. i believe the next hearing that we will have deals without patients in general. you could have the best care in the world, but of the veteran does not know about it, it does no good at all. significant strides forward have been approved. we must do more to insure better prevention for today's service members tomorrow. the army, and i think we are all levelof the frightening of suicides within members of the armed services today. practically one per day. they have got to help us address this issue. based on the efforts of this committee, the behavior
institutions that have been welcomed into tenet and an environment where everybody else wanted to reduce us access to care. and you start having a conversation around that and where this would be disrupted in health care services or disruptions in providers. we also have to acknowledge the historical experiences of mistreatment and mistrust in commuters of color as well as lgbt communities have experienced discrimination from health care providers, and also just experienced discrimination just trying to get access to the system. so as we look at health care implementation is not just going to be about what the benefits look like but it's going to be about whether not the lgbt of americans are being overwhelmingly impacted by the hiv epidemic are going to have access to these services that they need. thing about the treatment cascade and one of the things we know from recent analysis of the treatment cascade, by age and race is that younger americans are less likely experience -- less likely to engage in health care system. there's a story behind that don't have the necessary gotten to the h
bron james, gives miami a two-point lead. >> the heat is definitely on. >> this is a hostile environment, for to us come in and get a big road win on the road, awesome. >> you're live in the cnn newsroom. >>> good morning. thank you for joining me. i'm carol cosstello. steubenville, ohio, two teenagers due in court accused of making online threats in the explosive rape case. the latest ripple in a case that blown the town apart. the victim raped by two high school ftball players, two local girls, one 15, the other 16, spent the night in juvenile detention. the victim's mother is pleading for calm and compassion. >> my family and i are hopeful that we can put this horrible ordeal behind us. we need and deserve to focus on our daughter's future. we hope that from this, something good good can arise. i feel i have an opportunity to bring an awareness to others, possibly change the mentality of a youth or help a parent to have more of an awareness of where their children are and what they are doing. adults need to take responsibility, guide these children. i ask every person listening, what
the environment. >> now mike. where are the showers? >> live doppler 7 hd show showers in the north bay but well have scattered showers throughout the morning hours and in the afternoon hours, temperatures are in the 50's to 60 and it will be dry starting tomorrow. sue? >> 80 westbound, an accident on the shoulder here. we are seeing bunching up where 580 merges and heavy traffic to the bay bridge and san mateo bridge, reports of an accident eastbound at the toll plaza but not too much slowing in hayward area and an accident in cupertino, 280, that also, cleared to the side of th announcer: it's "live! with kelly & michael." today, "les mis" star hugh jackman, and oscar-winner jennifer lawrence. plus, everything you need to get a good night's sleep. all next on the emmy ward-winning "live." now, here are kelly ripa and michael strahan! [cheers and applause] ♪ michael: march on in there. kelly: thank you. thank you. hi! hi! hello. hello. hey, everybody, happy first day of spring! michael: yes. [applause] wednesday, march 20, 2013, it officially began at 2:02 this morning. michael: so 7:02 was t
that could easily get caught and mangled in devices. monday equipment, the environment was a threat to children as well as the factories that put out the fumes and toxins. when inhaled these children would often result in illness, chronic conditions or disease. and harvesting crops in extreme temperatures during long hours were considered normal for children. the labor movement spearheaded the fight against the child labor practices that were going on. as early as 1836 we had union members of the national trades union convention made the first formal public proposal recommending that states establish a minimum age for factory work. that year massachusetts enacted the first state law restricting child labor for workers under 15. over the next several decades, the efforts of labor movements successfully achieved minimum age laws in other states and in 1881, the a.f.l. proposed a national law banning all children under 14 from employment. and in 1892, the democratic party adopted the a.f.l.'s child labor platform and began to push for a national child labor law. and finally in 1938, co
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)